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Red Flag (Fire Weather) Warning in New Jersey

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

Posted 4 hours, 48 minutes ago – National Weather Service

Red Flag Warning remains in effect from 10 am this morning to 8 pm EDT this evening for low relative humidity and strong wind for eastern Pennsylvania, most of New Jersey, Delaware and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

  • Winds: northwest 10 to 20 mph with gusts up to 30 mph.
  • Timing: strongest winds will be late this morning into the early afternoon. With the lowest Humidities from late morning into the early evening.
  • Relative humidity: in the teens and 20s.
  • Temperatures: mainly in the lower to mid 60s.
  • Impacts: The combination of Windy conditions and low relative humidity values will lead to a more rapid spread rate of any fires that may develop. Residents are encouraged to exercise fire prevention with any outdoor activities and properly dispose of smoking materials.

 

Recommended actions

A Red Flag Warning means that critical Fire weather conditions are either occurring now, or will shortly due to a combination of strong winds, low relative humidity, and dry fuels. Any fires that develop may quickly get out of control and become difficult to contain.

For more information about wildfire danger, burn restrictions. And wildfire prevention and education, please visit your state forestry or environmental protection Website.

Excerpted from ready.govBefore:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Plant fire-resistant shrubs and trees. For example, hardwood trees are less flammable than pine, evergreen, eucalyptus or fir trees. Regularly clean roof and gutters.
  • Use 1/8-inch mesh screen beneath porches, decks, floor areas, and the home itself. Also, screen openings to floors, roof and attic.
  • Keep handy household items that can be used as fire tools: a rake, axe, handsaw or chain saw, bucket and shovel.
  • Consider installing protective shutters or heavy fire-resistant drapes.
  • Clear items that will burn from around the house, including wood piles, lawn furniture, barbecue grills, tarp coverings, etc. Move them outside of your defensible space.
  • Identify and maintain an adequate outside water source such as a small pond, cistern, well, swimming pool, or hydrant.
  • Have a garden hose that is long enough to reach any area of the home and other structures on the property.
  • More about what to do before a wildfire.

During:

  • Wear protective clothing when outside – sturdy shoes, cotton or woolen clothes, long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, gloves and a handkerchief to protect your face.
  • Close outside attic, eaves and basement vents, windows, doors, pet doors, etc. Remove flammable drapes and curtains. Close all shutters, blinds or heavy non-combustible window coverings to reduce radiant heat.
  • Close all doors inside the house to prevent draft. Open the damper on your fireplace, but close the fireplace screen.
  • Shut off any natural gas, propane or fuel oil supplies at the source.
  • Connect garden hoses to outdoor water faucet and fill any pools, hot tubs, garbage cans, tubs or other large containers with water.
  • Place lawn sprinklers on the roof and near above-ground fuel tanks. Leave sprinklers on and dowsing these strutures as long as possible.
  • If you have gas-powered pumps for water, make sure they are fueled and ready. Place a ladder against the house in clear view.
  • More about what to do during a wildfire.

What is a Red Flag Warning?

 

A Warning issued by National Weather Service fire weather forecasters to alert forecast users to an ongoing or imminent critical fire weather pattern. The warning product alerts land management agencies to the potential for widespread new ignitions or control problems with existing fires, both of which could pose a threat to life and property.

It is issued when it is an on-going event or the fire weather forecaster has a high degree of confidence that Red Flag criteria will occur within 48 hours of issuance. Red Flag criteria is based on local area vegetation characteristics, local climatology, select weather criteria and/or any combination of critical weather and fuel moisture forecasts. In some states, dry lightning and unstable air are criteria. A Fire Weather Watch may be issued prior to the Red Flag Warning.

Source: weather.gov

Information on Upcoming Storm Sunday-Monday

Posted by on Feb 28, 2014 in Alerts, Latest Events | No Comments

Latest Briefing Package:  http://www.erh.noaa.gov/phi/briefing/packages/current_briefing.pdf

From the National Weather Service

Sunday:   A slight chance of rain or freezing rain before 8am, then a chance of rain. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 47. Calm wind becoming northwest around 6 mph in the morning. Chance of precipitation is 40%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible

Sunday Night:   Rain, snow, and sleet before 1am, then snow, freezing rain, and sleet between 1am and 4am, then snow after 4am. Low around 27. North wind 6 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Little or no ice accumulation expected. New snow and sleet accumulation of around an inch possible.

Monday:  Snow. High near 29. Chance of precipitation is 90%.

Monday Night:  Snow likely, mainly before midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 13. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Possible Snowfall Amounts:

StormTotalSnowWebFcst

Major Nor’easter February 12th-13th Update 2/12/14 @ 1645

Posted by on Feb 13, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

• A strong coastal storm system will impact the region starting tonight & continuing into
Thursday.
• Heavy snow, sleet, freezing rain and coastal flooding are all threats from this storm.
• 10+ inches of snow are expected where the heaviest snow band sets up. Much of the
region will see at least some snow. Snow will start Wednesday evening, generally AFTER
the Wednesday afternoon/evening commute. Warnings & advisories have been posted.
• Icing due to freezing rain will be a tenth of an inch or less. Also, heavy wet snow will cling
to trees and wires, adding to the potential for power outages.
• Strong winds will be an issue with this event as the storm intensifies along the coast.
Gusts up to 50 mph are possible along the coast, with gusts in the 20 to 35 mph range
inland from late Wednesday night through most of Thursday. This will cause added stress
to power lines and tree limbs covered with heavy snow.
• Minor coastal flooding is likely and moderate coastal flooding is possible with this storm
along the Atlantic coast, as well as in the Delaware Bay & Raritan Bay. The high tides to
watch are both high tides on Thursday, as well as the morning high tide on Friday.
Significant rainfall along the coast may worsen the coastal flooding impacts.
• This is the last scheduled briefing package for this event. You now need to be
monitoring our website for the latest information.

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/phi National Weather Service
Philadelphia/Mt. Holly

StormTotalSnowWebFcst

Snowfall amounts

• The heaviest snowfall will be to the
northwest of the I-95 corridor.
• However, a large part of the area will
see 6+ inches of snow.
• Snowfall starts Wednesday evening
and continues into Thursday. Heaviest
snow will fall during the late overnight
hours into Thursday morning.
• Snowfall rates of 1 to 2 inches per
hour are possible late Wednesday
night into Thursday morning.
• This will be a wet, heavy snow that
will cling to trees and wires. Blowing
and drifting snow will be a problem
later tonight and into Thursday.
• Temperatures on Thursday will range
from the upper 20s far north to mid
30s south. Cold…but not bitter cold.
This may help with road conditions.
• There will also be some sleet with this
storm, but it will not have as much
impact as the snow.

Major Nor’easter February 12th-13th

Posted by on Feb 11, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

From the latest briefing package – February 11, 2014 at 16:00

•A strong coastal storm system is still expected to impact the region starting Wednesday night & continuing into Thursday.
•Heavy snow, sleet, and coastal flooding are all threats from this storm.
•10+ inches of snow are expected where the heaviest snow band sets up. Much of the region will see at least some snow. Snow will start Wednesday evening, generally AFTER the Wednesday afternoon/evening commute. Watches and warnings have been posted.
•Icing due to freezing rain no longer appears to be a major threat from this event. However, heavy wet snow will cling to trees and wires.
•Strong winds will be an issue with this event as the storm intensifies along the coast. Gusts up to 40 mph are possible along the coast, with gusts in the 20 to 30 mph range inland from late Wednesday night through most of Thursday. This will cause added stress to power lines and tree limbs covered with heavy snow.
•Minor coastal flooding is likely and moderate coastal flooding is possible with this storm along the Atlantic coast, as well as in the Delaware Bay & Raritan Bay. The high tides to watch are both high tides on Thursday, as well as the morning high tide on Friday. Significant rainfall along the coast may worsen the coastal flooding impacts.
•Next briefing package will be issued by 400 PM Wednesday, Feb 12th.
•Monitor our website for the latest information.
• http://www.erh.noaa.gov/phi

 

 

Projected Snowfall http___www.erh.noaa

Major Nor’easter February 12th-13th – NWS Briefing Package

Posted by on Feb 10, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/phi/briefing/packages/current_briefing.pdf

 

A strong coastal storm system is expected to impact the region starting
Wednesday night & continuing into Thursday.
• Heavy snow, icing due to freezing rain, and coastal flooding are all threats from
this storm.
• 8+ inches of snow are expected where the heaviest snow band sets up. Much
of the region will see at least some snow. Snow will start Wednesday night.
• Icing due to freezing rain is also a threat. Icing amounts over a tenth of an inch
are possible where the freezing rain area sets up near the I-95 corridor.
• Minor coastal flooding is likely and moderate coastal flooding is possible with
this storm along the Atlantic coast, as well as in the Delaware Bay & Raritan Bay.
The high tides to watch are both high tides on Thursday, as well as the morning
high tide on Friday. Significant rainfall along the coast may worsen the coastal
flooding impacts.
• Next briefing package will be issued by 400 PM Tuesday, Feb 11th.

Upcoming storm may be bringing significant snow…

Posted by on Feb 10, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

Storm should hit us between Wednesday night and Thursday.  More to come.


Mt Holly Weather service is currently working on a briefing package for a potential significant coastal storm later this week.  The package should be out later this afternoon.  Attached is an early estimate of potential snow fall.

As of 2/10/14 @ 16:07

Upcoming storm may be bringing significant snow…

Posted by on Feb 10, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

Storm should hit us between Wednesday night and Thursday.  More to come.


Mt Holly Weather service is currently working on a briefing package for a potential significant coastal storm later this week.  The package should be out later this afternoon.  Attached is an early estimate of potential snow fall.

As of 2/10/14 @ 16:07

Here Comes the Snow Again…

Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

Cumberland County

Winter Weather Advisory
Statement as of 8:53 PM EST on February 02, 2014
… Winter Weather Advisory in effect from 9 am to 5 PM EST
Monday…The National Weather Service in Mount Holly has issued a Winter
Weather Advisory for snow and sleet… which is in effect from 9
am to 5 PM EST Monday.* Locations… a portion of marylands Eastern Shore through central
Delaware and a portion of far southern New Jersey.* Snow accumulations… 1 to possibly 3 inches. Confidence for 3
inch accumulations is below average but this area is within a
transition zone where precipitation can be either heavy rain or
heavy wet snow.

* Timing… rain Monday morning changes to sleet or briefly heavy
wet snow sometime between 8 am and noon.

* Winds… north 10 to 15 mph with gusts up to 20 mph.

* Temperatures… in the lower 30s.

* Impacts… untreated roads and walkways should be snow covered
and slippery by late morning or midday… creating hazardous
conditions.

* After the storm… .snow quickly tapers to flurries during mid
afternoon. Any standing water or slush will freeze Monday night
as temperatures drop into the teens and lower 20s.

Precautionary/preparedness actions…

A Winter Weather Advisory means that periods of snow… sleet… or
freezing rain will cause travel difficulties. Be prepared for
slippery roads and limited visibilities… and use caution while
driving.

Update from the ROIC on tonight’s weather 1-28-14

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments
NJ ROIC
Subject: STATEWIDE WEATHER WARNING// WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY
 
MESSAGE TYPE: WARNING

INCIDENT TYPE: WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY

INCIDENT DATE/TIME: 28 January, 2014  1700 HRS.


SOURCE: NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOUNT HOLLY, NJ


HANDLING: FOUO


The New Jersey Regional Operations Intelligence Center (NJ ROIC) reports the State Office of Emergency Management (NJ OEM) is monitoring a weather event in coordination with the National Weather Service (NWS).


SUMMARY: A Winter Weather Advisory remains in effect from 5 PM this afternoon to 5 AM Wednesday for Atlantic and Cape May counties.


IMPACT: Periods of snow will cause slippery roads and limited visibility.


Full Forecast(s):

ATLANTIC-CAPE MAY

1123 AM EST TUE JAN 28 2014


…WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM THIS

AFTERNOON TO 5 AM EST WEDNESDAY…


* HAZARD TYPES…SNOW.


* SNOW ACCUMULATIONS…1 TO 2 INCHES IN MOST OF SOUTHEASTERN NEW

JERSEY, WITH 2 TO 4 INCHES ACROSS SUSSEX COUNTY IN DELAWARE TO

CAPE MAY COUNTY IN NEW JERSEY.


* TIMING…SNOW WILL OVERSPREAD THE AREA GENERALLY FROM SOUTH TO

NORTH EARLY THIS EVENING, THEN TAPER OFF TOWARD DAYBREAK

WEDNESDAY.


* IMPACTS…ROADS WILL BECOME SNOW COVERED AND SLIPPERY DUE TO

TEMPERATURES WELL BELOW FREEZING AND ACCUMULATING SNOW. TRAVEL

CONDITIONS WILL BECOME HAZARDOUS.


PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…


A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY MEANS THAT PERIODS OF SNOW WILL CAUSE

TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES. BE PREPARED FOR SLIPPERY ROADS AND LIMITED

VISIBILITIES, AND USE CAUTION WHILE DRIVING.

Update on Snowcast for January 28, 2014

Posted by on Jan 28, 2014 in Alerts | No Comments

From the National Weather Service…